Molecular Stop Signal Identified: The Surveillance System of Cell Division

Several million cells divide every second in our bodies. During nuclear division (mitosis), the genetic material must be distributed correctly and completely between the daughter cells – errors in this process can lead to defective developments or genetic disorders, and many cancer cells are also characterised by unequal numbers of chromosomes. Therefore, if errors in the division process become apparent, the cell can stop it. Biologists at the University of Duisburg-Essen have been able to elucidate this process at a molecular level. The scientific journal ‘Current Biology’ has published their findings

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Cancer Research: DNA Repair Mechanism Further Elucidated

Researchers at the University of Würzburg, led by Caroline Kisker in cooperation with Claudia Höbartner, discovered how the protein XPD detects a severe DNA damage and controls its repair.

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Derivatives of the thalidomide compound drive resistant cancer cells to their deaths

A study by Goethe University Frankfurt points to the possibility that thalidomide derivatives are potentially suitable for treating cancer. Thalidomide was marketed in the 1950s as a sleeping pill. It later gained sad notoriety for causing severe fetal abnormalities in the early stages of pregnancy. It is meanwhile known that the molecule marks proteins in the cell for degradation. For the current study, the researchers produced thalidomide derivatives. They were able to show that these influence the degradation of proteins responsible for the survival of cancer cells.

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Immuntherapie für Leukämie sicherer und wirksamer machen

Freiburger Forscher*innen haben einen Weg gefunden, wie die Wirkung der zellbasierten CAR-T-Zell-Therapie bei einer Leukämie verstärkt und die Nebenwirkungen reduziert werden könnte / Veröffentlichung in Nature Cancer

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Traffic noise, a novel risk factor for cardiovascular diseases

An international group of noise experts from the Copenhagen Cancer Institute (Denmark), the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Philadelphia (USA) and the Department of Cardiology at the Mainz University Medical Center have analyzed recent epidemiological data and found strong evidence that transportation noise is closely linked to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. As a result, the researchers call for traffic noise to be recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The results of their analyses were published today in the renowned journal of the American Heart Association, Circulation Research.

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Professor Dr Robert Zeiser receives DKMS Mechtild Harf Science Award 2024

DKMS emphasizes its commitment to blood cancer research, supports young scientists, and recognizes outstanding research achievements in the field of stem cell transplantation.

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Study Lays the Basis for New Knowledge on Gastrointestinal Diseases

The transition from the esophagus to the stomach is a delicate region from a medical point of view, often associated with pathological disorders leading to cancer. An international research team has now gained new insights into this region. These pave the way for new prevention and treatment options.

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New Research Results – Safety of Short-Term Cultivated CAR T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

Short-term cultivated, individualised immune cells (CAR T cells) are currently being developed as a therapeutic option for patients with blood cancer. A research team from the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut has shown with mouse and cell models that these cells carry a higher risk for cytokine release syndrome than conventional CAR T cells. The cytokine release is caused by residual components of vector particles on the CAR T cells and is independent of tumour cells. Careful consideration of the safety of this innovative treatment is required to minimise risks to patients. EMBO Molecular Medicine reports on the results in its issue dated 21 March 2024.

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Erste Übersicht der Langzeitfolgen von Krebsimmuntherapien

Krebs-Therapien mit so genannten „Immuncheckpoint-Inhibitoren“ (ICI) sind inzwischen weit verbreitet, doch ihre Langzeitwirkungen noch kaum erfasst. Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler aus dem Deutschen Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) haben nun
erstmals systematisch Studien zu den Langzeitfolgen dieser Therapien zusammengefasst. Ein signifikanter Anteil der Cancer Survivor berichtet über eingeschränkte Lebensqualität und unerwünschte Nebenwirkungen der Therapie. Allerdings sei noch wesentlich detaillierteres Wissen über die Langzeiteffekte der ICI erforderlich, betonen die Forschenden, um den Betroffenen die bestmögliche Nachsorge zu bieten.

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Krebs: Rauchen und auch E-Zigaretten verändern die Software der Zelle

Raucher:innen und Konsument:innen von E-Zigaretten teilen nicht nur eine Gewohnheit, sondern auch ähnliche, mit Krebs assoziierte Veränderungen an Zellen, so eine neue Studie von Wissenschaftler:innen der Universität Innsbruck und dem University College London (UCL), veröffentlicht in der Fachzeitschrift Cancer Research.

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Decoding the Language of Epigenetic Modifications

Epigenetic changes play important roles in cancer, metabolic and aging-related diseases, but also during loss of resilience as they cause the genetic material to be incorrectly interpreted in affected cells. A major study by scientists at Helmholtz Munich published in ’Nature’ now provides important new insights into how complex epigenetic modification signatures regulate the genome. This study will pave the way for new treatments of diseases caused by faulty epigenetic machineries.

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Shredding to plan – protein recycling for immune defense

The waste system of living cells, the proteasome, not only shreds disused or damaged proteins. It also supports the immune system in recognizing virally infected or cancerous cells by producing protein fragments, so-called immunopeptides. In an international collaboration, researchers led by Juliane Liepe at the Max Planck Institute (MPI) for Multidisciplinary Sciences have now simulated protein degradation by the proteasome in the laboratory and identified and quantified the peptides thereby produced. In future, the resulting data set could help predict immunopeptides and develop new vaccines against infectious diseases or cancer.

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Internationaler Kinderkrebstag: Neues Beratungsangebot des UKE | Fragen an… Priv.-Doz. Dr. Gabriele Escherich

Mehr als 2.000 Kinder und Jugendliche in Deutschland erkranken jährlich an Krebs. Wenn ein Kind oder ein Elternteil die Diagnose Krebs erhält, hat dies Auswirkungen auf das gesamte Familienleben. Das Universitäre Cancer Center Hamburg (UCCH) des Universitätsklinikums Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE) hat daher eine psychosoziale Beratungsstelle für an Krebs erkrankte Kinder, Jugendliche und junge Erwachsene sowie deren Familien eingerichtet. Anlässlich des Internationalen Kinderkrebstags am 15. Februar informiert Priv.-Doz. Dr. Gabriele Escherich, Oberärztin in der Klinik für Pädiatrische Hämatologie und Onkologie des UKE, über das neu geschaffene Angebot.

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New strategy for safer CAR T cell therapy in lymphomas

Scientists from University Hospital Cologne have developed a procedure in the laboratory that effectively fights the affected cells in lymphoma cancer, but does not damage healthy immune cells, which is often the case with comparable therapies / publication in ‘Cell Reports Medicine’

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New T-FINDER Platform Provides Deep Insights Into T Cell Responses Against Novel Cancer Vaccine

Researchers at the BioMed X Institute and the Universitätsmedizin Mannheim just published the results of their collaboration around a new neoepitope vaccine in diffuse midline glioma in Science Advances.

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Precursor of Cholesterol Protects Cells From Ferroptosis

A precursor of cholesterol, previously categorised as harmful, can protect cancer cells from cell death. This finding, published in Nature, opens new doors for cancer research.

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Special RNA suppresses the formation of breast cancer cells

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. The development of breast cancer often originates from epithelial cells in the mammary gland – the very cells that specialise in milk production during and after pregnancy. A team of researchers from Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany), the university in Shenzhen (China) and Jena University Hospital (Germany) has taken a closer look at this specialisation process and deciphered a molecular mechanism that also appears to play an important role in cancer development. It may be possible to develop new diagnostic procedures and treatment methods for breast cancer based on these research findings.

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New way to force pathogenic proteins into degradation

Researchers develop novel cancer protein killer and discover a new ligase for PROTACs

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Nanoparticles for optimized cancer therapy

Researchers from Göttingen and Karlsruhe have developed a new treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. The innovative method promises to be able to treat the disease in a more targeted way and with fewer side effects in the future. The therapy is now to be optimized for clinical application as quickly as possible.

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Reducing vitamin B5 slows breast cancer growth

Scientists have discovered in animal experiments that breast cancer cells heavily rely on vitamin B5 to grow and survive / Publication in ‘Nature Metabolism‘

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A Potential Target for New Anti-Cancer Agents

MYC proteins play an important role in many types of cancer. A research team at the University of Würzburg has now succeeded in indirectly influencing these proteins – with clear consequences for the tumor.

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Deceiving cancer to facilitate treatment The effect of the phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells and how to exploit it

Cancer cells are notorious for rapidly changing their phenotype, driving within-host spread and evading treatment. Scientists in Plön used a mathematical model to understand the role of a signal used by cancer cells to control their phenotype. By manipulating these signals, cancer cells can be tricked into a less harmful phenotype that is more responsive to treatments.

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New insights into the prognostic power of gene expression signatures in breast cancer

When a woman is diagnosed with breast cancer, the difficult question arises as to which type of treatment is the right one. Gene expression testing is one of the methods used by doctors to help make a prognosis about the course of the disease and, based on this, to select a suitable therapy. However, the reliability of these tests has not been fully established. Scientists from Leipzig University and the Pathologie Hamburg-West institute have now used machine learning to analyse large amounts of data on this question and found that gene expression signatures offer a high degree of certainty in prognosis, but not complete certainty.

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DeepMB: A Deep Learning Framework For High-Quality Optoacoustic Imaging in Real-Time

Researchers at Helmholtz Munich and the Technical University of Munich have made significant progress in advancing high-resolution optoacoustic imaging for clinical use. Their innovative deep-learning framework, known as DeepMB, holds great promise for patients dealing with a range of illnesses, including breast cancer, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and inflammatory bowel disease. Their findings have been now published in Nature Machine Intelligence.

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Unraveling female resilience: Leveraging organ-on-chip technology to study the impact of menopause on re

Dynamic resilience, the ability of humans to withstand unexpected changes and stressors, is pivotal for maintaining bodily functions and overall health. Aging adults and especially women after menopause are at higher risk of adverse health outcomes (including frailty) in response to external stress situations such as cancer therapies or infections due to reduced dynamic resilience. Addressing the impact of female menopause on dynamic resilience and exploring preventive and therapeutic strategies is the aim of an international and interdisciplinary research group led by Prof. Dr. Peter Loskill from the NMI Natural and Medical Sciences Institute and the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen.

Quelle: IDW Informationsdienst Wissenschaft